Someone Else’s Shoes

Gone Like Yesterday

The Theory of (Not Quite) Everything

The Scioto County Public Library would like to recommend these book titles. Each title is available to borrow with your library card! For more book recommendations or information on applying for a library card go to www.yourppl.org or call 740-354-5688.

Someone Else’s Shoes by Jojo Moyes – Nisha Cantor lives the life of the seriously wealthy, until her husband announces a divorce and cuts her off. Nisha is determined to hang onto her glamorous life. Sam Kemp – in the bleakest point of her life – has accidentally taken Nisha’s gym bag. But Sam hardly has time to worry about a lost gym bag—she’s struggling to keep herself and her family afloat. When she tries on Nisha’s six-inch high Christian Louboutin red crocodile shoes, the resulting jolt of confidence makes her realize something must change—and that thing is herself. Readers might also enjoy Fast Friends by Jill Mansell or Porch Lights by Dorothea Benton Frank.

Gone Like Yesterday by Janelle M. Williams – Zahra, a listless college prep coach, and Sammie, a teenage girl and budding activist soon off to college—are drawn to each other through the songs of gypsy moths. Gypsy moths have been singing the songs of Zahra’s ancestors to her for years, so when Zahra realizes that Sammie might be a moth person too, their paths become intertwined. Then Zahra’s brother, Derrick, goes missing. Derrick has always been different—sensitive and connected to the spiritual world, he has been drifting from Zahra and her family for some time. But this time feels different. Zahra is panicked that he may really be gone for good, lost to her forever. Readers might also enjoy Such a Fun Age by Kiley Reid or When No One is Watching by Alyssa Cole.

The Theory of (Not Quite) Everything by Kara Gnodde – Meet Art and Mimi Brotherton. Devoted siblings and housemates, they’re bound together by the tragic death of their parents. Mathematical genius Art relies on logic, while Mimi prefers to follow her heart. When Mimi decides she needs more from life than dutifully tending to her brilliant brother, she asks for his help to find love. Art agrees, but on one condition: that she find her soulmate using a strict mathematical principle. Things seem promising, until Mimi meets Frank: a romantic, spontaneous stargazer who’s also a mathematician. Despite Mimi’s obvious affection for the quirky Frank, Art is wary of him from their very first encounter. As Art’s mistrust of Frank grows, so do Mimi’s feelings, and the siblings’ relationship is brought to a breaking point. Something about Frank doesn’t quite add up, and only Art can see it… Readers might also enjoy The One Hundred Years of Lenni and Margot by Marianne Cronin or The Rosie Project