Isomaltulose, another kind of sugar


By John DiTraglia



Isomaltulose is like sucrose only different. They are both disaccharides composed of the two monosaccharides, glucose and fructose. But the chemical bond between those monosaccharides is different. This leads to some other differences. Tho they both contribute the same number of calories, isomaltulose is digested and absorbed slower than the same glucose and fructose contributed by sucrose. This means that your blood sugar rises slower after eating isomaltulose and then your insulin levels rise slower. That is, isomaltulose has a lower glycemic index.

Isomaltulose is only half as sweet to your taste buds so you need to eat twice as many calories to get the same amount of sweet taste.

Isomaltulose is not fermented by the bacteria in you mouth as well so it provokes less tooth decay.

As regards weight control, there might be some benefit to isomaltulose versus sucrose because the slower digestion leads to more sugar reaching further down the intestinal tract that causes different intestinal hormone responses.

Isomaltulose is present in honey and sugar cane together with sucrose.

Isomaltulose should not be confused with isomaltose which is another disaccharide that has the same relationship to maltose that isomaltulose has to sucrose having the different kind of connection between the two glucose monosaccharides that make up this pair. The word malt comes from the age old love of alcoholic brews that start with the cooking of grains to change the starch to sugar – malt – that can be fermented.

There you have it. Now you know something else about sugar, public enemy number one, or number three after Vladimir and Donald.

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By John DiTraglia

John DiTraglia M.D. is a Pediatrician in Portsmouth. He can be reached by e-mail- jditrag@zoomnet.net or phone-354-6605.

John DiTraglia M.D. is a Pediatrician in Portsmouth. He can be reached by e-mail- jditrag@zoomnet.net or phone-354-6605.