Claudius Cadot – French Pioneer


By Bob Boldman - Contributing Columnist



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Obituary 1875 – “Another Pioneer Fallen – Died on Saturday morning, May 15, 1875, Claudius Cadot, in the 82nd year of his age. Mr. Cadot was born in Gallipolis, Ohio, on February 17, 1793. His father, Claudius Cadot, Sr. and his mother (whose maiden name was Jane Bastine) were married in Paris, France, in 1790, and came to this country with a party of French emigrants very soon after their marriage. Their second child, and first son Claudius was the first male child born in Gallipolis. A few years later Mr. Cadot died and his wife having married again, to a Mr. Francis Charles Duteil. In 1825 Claudius Cadot was married to Miss Nancy Ball, who died in 1836. He was afterwards married to Miss Cynthia Stockham. She too was taken from him by death a few years later. For several years previous to his death he had been living with his daughter, Mrs. Hayward, at Wheelersburg, Ohio. On Tuesday morning, May 11th, he determined to visit his son, who lives on the old farm on Pine Creek, six miles northeast of Wheelersburg. Immediately after his arrival, he was seized with a chill and soon bedridden. Mr. Cadot had many friends, and but few, if any, enemies. A hard working, prudent and kind hearted man, he will be missed and mourned by all who knew him. His body put to rest upon a lofty and beautiful elevation on his own farm, in an enclosure surrounded by a massive stone wall, prepared by his-self.” (Portsmouth. Tribune – Thursday, May 27, 1875)

History records that – Claudius Cadot was born February 17, 1793, and the first male child born west of the Ohio River in Gallia County and his sister Marie Louise ( Cadot ) LeClercq, was the first female child born west of the Ohio River in Gallia County in 1791 and their brother Lemuel Cadot was born around 1794 in Gallia county as well. His father was Claudius Cadot, Sr., and his mother Jane Bastille, both from France and married in Paris in 1790. After their marriage they emigrated to Gallipolis. Arriving in the fall of 1790. In 1795, Claudius Cadot, senior, fell victim to the climate and died. In three months his widow married Francis Charles Duteil. Three months later Duteil brought his bride, and step-children down to his newly built cabin, located within the French Grant. Young Claudius worked on his stepfather’s farm and learned the art of distilling fruits and grains.

In the spring of 1812 he volunteered in Capt. John Lucas’ Company for one year to go into the war of 1812. He went as far as Urbana, and there his Company joined Col. Duncan McArthur’s Regiment, 1st Ohio Volunteers. General Hull took command of the army and marched, to Detroit where he surrendered on the 16th of August. Upon the release of Cadot from the enemy he returned to Gallipolis.

After that he engaged in keel boating on the Ohio river, in connection with the celebrated Mike Fink, and earned about 50 cents per day at first and afterwards 62 1/2 cents per day. He followed this for four years and saved enough money to buy a quarter section of land. On December 17, 1819, he married Nancy Ball and in 1820, he moved onto land he bought. In 1820, he built him a large frame house. June 9, 1835, he lost his wife. He afterwards married Cynthia Stockham, whom he also survived. After the death of his second wife, he broke up house-keeping and resided with his daughter, Mrs. Mary Hayward, first in the vicinity of Wheelersburg and afterwards in Wheelersburg. He was the last survivor of his Company in the War of 1812, and drew an Army pension.

By good fortune, too, he invested the tough earnings of his youth, made at keel-boating and other strenuous pursuits, in land located near the iron furnaces of the Pine Creek country in the Hanging Rock region. Cadot always had something to sell. If neighbors—who also lived on farms—ran short of feed, or fruit, or young stock, Cadot could nearly always supply them. He continued to prosper adding to his holdings until his farm grew to comprise hundreds of acres. At the end of life, his worth was equated and found to net nearly $60,000, in addition to his real estate holding’s, it presented a valuable object lesson as to what a young man in this country, starting with his bare hands, and working without an uncertain undertaking, may achieve. And besides his worldly accumulations, he left not only a worthy example to the community, but the record of a pure life and honorable name to his family. “Achieve for today!”

Boldman
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By Bob Boldman

Contributing Columnist

Bob Boldman is a local historian. He can be reached by email: g.boldman5@gmail.com

Bob Boldman is a local historian. He can be reached by email: g.boldman5@gmail.com