A symptom of a world in pandemonium: violence


Melissa Martin, Ph.D.



Kids are killing kids. Did they learn homicide from adults killing adults? I vote yes. My granny always said, “When you point your finger at somebody else, your thumb is pointing right back at you.”

After the Garden of Eden fiasco, homicide entered the world when Cain killed Abel. The Bible is full of stories of aggression, brutality, invasion — both Old and New Testaments. And humanity’s bloodthirsty nature hit the ultimate pinnacle when innocent Jesus, the Messiah, was bruised, beaten and killed.

Psychologists, politicians, police officers and helping professionals search for clandestine causes and covert/overt clues — maybe they need to be asking preachers.

“You desire but do not have, so you kill. You covet, but you cannot get what you want, so you quarrel and fight. You do not have because you do not ask God. When you ask, you do not receive because you ask with wrong motives, that you may spend what you get on your pleasures.” James 4:2-3, New International Version (NIV).

Look backward in time. What do we find in civilization? Violence in the form of human sacrifice.

According to a 2018 article, “Evidence for the largest single incident of mass child sacrifice in the Americas — and likely in world history — has been discovered on Peru’s northern coast, archaeologists tell National Geographic.” www.news.nationalgeographic.com.

Human sacrifice among the Aztec, Maya and Inca have been recorded in chronicles and documented in scientific excavations.

From the Ages of Stone, Bronze and Iron to the Industrial Revolution to the Age of Information, humans have killed humans. So why do we express bewilderment in the 21st century when incidents of mass shootings, ethnic cleansing and domestic violence stain our planet — an unmitigated history of spilled blood? So why are we stunned and shaken to the core when our children kill each other? The Digital Revolution has not miraculously changed the human heart. Technology has not tempered the abuse of power, greed and the craving for more. Murder is alive and well on our planet.

Wars are still fought over religion, real estate, rivalries and revenge. Humans die over gold, silver, diamonds, oil, minerals and resources, and the list goes on and on.

New York Times journalist Chris Hedges, author of “What Every Person Should Know About War,” wrote, “Of the past 3,400 years, humans have been entirely at peace for 268 of them, or just 8 percent of recorded history.”

We chase peace in America, peace in the Middle East and peace on planet Earth like a dog chases his tail, never catching it.

Look frontward in time. What do we find in civilization? Violence in the form of domestic brutality.

Siblings killing each other. Spouses and partners killing each other for life insurance policy payoffs. The home is a battleground.

Sexual abuse in sacred places — pedophiles in homes, schools, sports and places of worship.

Teen dating violence, date rape and date rape drugs. According to the National Center for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, more than 80 percent of rape cases are date rape.

Elder abuse includes verbal, emotional, physical, sexual; exploitation, neglect and abandonment. Perpetrators include children, other family members and spouses, as well as staff at nursing homes, assisted living and other facilities.

The National Organization of Parents of Murdered Children created a Murder Wall called Honoring Their Memories, a traveling tribute honoring the memory of all murdered loved ones. www.pomc.com.

Directions for Youth & Families provides consulting for troubled families and young people to help them identify strengths and learn new skills that lead to healthier decision making. www.dfyf.org.

Lest readers feel hopelessness over contents of this column — read on.

“Yet where sin was powerful, God’s gift of undeserved grace was even more powerful.” Romans 5:20, Contemporary English Version.

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Melissa Martin, Ph.D.

Melissa Martin, Ph.D., is an author, self-syndicated columnist, educator and therapist. She resides in Scioto County, Ohio. www.melissamartinchildrensauthor.com. Contact her at melissamcolumnist@gmail.com.

Melissa Martin, Ph.D., is an author, self-syndicated columnist, educator and therapist. She resides in Scioto County, Ohio. www.melissamartinchildrensauthor.com. Contact her at melissamcolumnist@gmail.com.

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