A little Cinnamon and Sugar for the Holidays


By Derrick C. Parker - For The Daily Times



Happy Pot owner Cinamon Wellington and her daughter Paisley donate no-sew blankets for those in need. The blankets were made by individuals in recovery from the Counseling Center. L-R: Cinamon Wellington, Paisley Wellington, Kye Cook, and Chad Waller of TCC.

Happy Pot owner Cinamon Wellington and her daughter Paisley donate no-sew blankets for those in need. The blankets were made by individuals in recovery from the Counseling Center. L-R: Cinamon Wellington, Paisley Wellington, Kye Cook, and Chad Waller of TCC.


PORTSMOUTH – About a year and a half ago, Happy Pot owner Cinamon Wellington began a new program in partnership with the Counseling Center (TCC). The program services folks in TCC’s recovery pipeline by giving them group art projects to work on together.

“It can be pottery, canvas, wreaths, no-sew blankets, Thanksgiving Day cards – anything I think sparks some joy and they can learn a lesson from,” said Wellington. “That’s important. I want them to learn a lesson in each program that they can take back and expand upon in group therapy.”

Wellington, a former employee of Job and Family Services, is a champion for folks in addiction recovery and treatment. Each week, she teaches four classes and services 40-70 individuals.

“Last week, we made 18 no-sew blankets for the homeless,” explained Wellington. We are donating them to Catholic Social Services so they can give them to people in need. We also made 140 Thanksgiving cards and distributed them amongst local nursing home residents. November was our month of giving back to show people how thankful we are. And, it helps keep these folks invested in our community.”

According to Wellington, the individuals in her program do not just learn artistic skills – but empathy and selflessness.

“When you’ve been knocked down so many times, it’s easy for them to feel invisible. But, I’m their biggest cheerleader. I believe in them and I believe in the program. No one is incapable of change. I hope they continue to make good choices and I pray they continue to grow and mend relationships and learn to forgive themselves. As we give back, these folks are learning to be selfless and learn that instant gratification isn’t always the answer.”

The Happy Pot owner feels she has also learned something from the experience.

“It’s been therapeutic for me, personally,” said Wellington. “I’ve learned to be even more compassionate. I think our community has become desensitized at times. We hear about addiction and substances and people can get very angry. But, these are people. They are mothers, fathers, brothers, sons, and daughters…we need to keep that human aspect of their stories in mind.”

Wellington says she has become like family to people within her programs.

“I get to hear their success stories. I hear when they buy a car or get their license or start college. They show me pictures of their kids. I also hear about the setbacks. But, it’s great to watch all the growth.”

Graduates of the program regularly come back to the Happy Pot and visit with Cinamon and her staff.

“That happens all the time. In fact, just three times in the last week,” she laughed. “It always makes me tear up. I had a gentleman come back who graduated the program and tell me he bought himself a car and put a down payment on his first house.”

“These people aren’t just customers. They are my friends. They are my family. I believe in them and I wish the entire community would, too.”

Wellington also praised TCC for creating so many success stories in Portsmouth.

“I don’t think they get enough credit. They have folks volunteer all the time. They set up Christmas Trees for Winterfest. They work the ice skating station. They pick up trash and plant flowers. They learn that with little acts of kindness comes happiness.”

As the holidays approach, Wellington asks that readers and the community keep an open mind with individuals in recovery and greet them with kindness.

“I believe in the good of humanity,” she said. “People can complain about the treatment facilities. But, what they forget is that these people have made the choice to get help and do what is right. I will never turn my back on them. I truly believe that with kindness you can make things better.”

Happy Pot owner Cinamon Wellington and her daughter Paisley donate no-sew blankets for those in need. The blankets were made by individuals in recovery from the Counseling Center. L-R: Cinamon Wellington, Paisley Wellington, Kye Cook, and Chad Waller of TCC.
https://www.portsmouth-dailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/28/2021/12/web1_260749012_1172040820271300_500597318108293977_n.jpgHappy Pot owner Cinamon Wellington and her daughter Paisley donate no-sew blankets for those in need. The blankets were made by individuals in recovery from the Counseling Center. L-R: Cinamon Wellington, Paisley Wellington, Kye Cook, and Chad Waller of TCC.

By Derrick C. Parker

For The Daily Times

Reach The Daily Times at (740) 353-3101 or by email at pdtnews@aimmediamidwest.com.

© 2021 Portsmouth Daily Times, all rights reserved

Reach The Daily Times at (740) 353-3101 or by email at pdtnews@aimmediamidwest.com.

© 2021 Portsmouth Daily Times, all rights reserved