Time flies an hour ahead


By Kimberly Jenkins - kjenkins@aimmediamidwest.com



Daylight Saving Time means springing forward an hour in the wee hours Sunday morning.

Daylight Saving Time means springing forward an hour in the wee hours Sunday morning.


Courtesy Photo

Don’t forget to change the clocks because this Sunday, March 14, at 2 a.m., it will be time to spring forward to daylight saving time.

On Sunday, residents will gain an hour of sunlight after the jump that will take place at 2 a.m. Contrary to what many believe, daylight saving time is actually daylight saving time. It is daylight saving time because daylight hours last longer during the summer months. On Nov. 7, 2021, we will fall back to standard time until the spring of 2022.

“Why is the switch of time necessary and will it ever end?” is a controversy that goes on every year. There is an age-old myth that daylight saving was a practice adopted to give farmers extra time in the sun to work out in the field, but that’s not why dozens of countries follow it.

There are several thoughts on who truly started wanting to change the time. It was not Benjamin Franklin who came up with the idea many sources say, and it was not George Hudson from New Zealand so he could go bug hunting longer. It was an idea from William Willett in London. Although he tried to get the British Parliament to pass it, he died before ever seeing his idea happen. Germany was the first country to enact daylight saving time. In 1966, there was the enactment of the Uniform Time Act, but states had the option of remaining on standard time all year, according to History.com.

Several countries, including Britain and Germany, implemented DST during World War I. The practice aimed to cut artificial lighting use so troops could conserve fuel for the war. The U.S. did not standardize the system until 1966 when it passed the Uniform Time Act.

The main purpose of daylight saving time (called “Summer Time” in many places in the world) is to make better use of daylight. Daylight saving time (DST) is a system to reduce electricity usage by extending daylight hours. For eight months out of the year, the U.S. and dozens of other countries follow DST, and for the remaining four months, revert to standard time in order to take full advantage of the sunlight.

As some studies were done, putting in heating and cooling plus now lighting, it is a debate as to whether it saves on electricity that much.

There are pros and cons for daylight saving time. Pros include longer evenings, especially in the summer, less artificial light. It’s lighter-it’s safer. The cons could cost money, make people sick due to lack of sleep, and don’t save energy, according to timeanddate.com.

The debate on whether to change the time in spring is a worldwide controversy and is debated more each year as springing forward time approaches.

The question of what would happen if daylight saving time became permanent? It is theorized that it would decrease car accidents saving hundreds of lives and fewer hours of the night could help reduce crime.

Whatever happens about the changes to daylight saving time will probably be debated for years to come. As for 2021, it is time to buckle up and prepare for the loss of sleep. All is not lost, though; most people will want to start taking advantage of the longer evenings not being ‘in the dark.’

Daylight Saving Time means springing forward an hour in the wee hours Sunday morning.
https://www.portsmouth-dailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/28/2021/03/web1_DST.jpgDaylight Saving Time means springing forward an hour in the wee hours Sunday morning. Courtesy Photo

By Kimberly Jenkins

kjenkins@aimmediamidwest.com

Reach Kimberly Jenkins (740)353-3101 ext. 1928

© 2021 Portsmouth Daily Times, all rights

Reach Kimberly Jenkins (740)353-3101 ext. 1928

© 2021 Portsmouth Daily Times, all rights