October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month


By Kimberly Jenkins - kjenkins@aimmediamidwest.com



The color for Domestic Violence Awareness Month is purple.

The color for Domestic Violence Awareness Month is purple.


Courtesy Photo

October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, which first began in 1981 by the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence as a Day of Unity to connect battered women’s advocates across the country.

According to new-hope.org, Domestic violence affects millions, both women and men, of every race, religion, culture and status. It’s not just punches and black eyes — it’s yelling, humiliation, stalking, manipulation, coercion, threats and isolation. It’s stealing a paycheck, keeping tabs online, non-stop texting, constant use the silent treatment, or calling someone stupid so often they believe it.

Since the Violence Against Women Act passed in 1994, America has come a long way. The landmark legislation combined new provisions that hold offenders accountable and provide programs and services for victims. Between 1993 and 2010, the overall rate of domestic violence dropped nearly two-thirds and state laws have reformed to address issues such as dating abuse in the workplace, stalking, employment discrimination and more.

The most common injuries reported included bruising, cuts, and scrapes, and the rates for these injuries were two to four times greater for the women than the men – www.new-hope.org

On the website whitehouse.gov posts: All Americans deserve a life free from the threat of physical and psychological harm. Tragically, far too many Americans are deprived of this right by perpetrators of domestic violence. During National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, we offer our support to the victims and survivors of this unacceptable atrocity and reaffirm our commitment to bringing justice to their abusers and offering hope to those who currently reside in volatile and unsafe living conditions.

Domestic violence is an evil that threatens the social fabric of our Nation. It is a widespread attack on the most sacred and intimate of institutions — the American family. Domestic violence tears families apart, with devastating consequences that can last for generations. Tragically, more than 10 million Americans suffer at the hands of loved ones each year, and women are twice as likely to be targets of this heinous crime as men. .whitehouse.gov The one thing that many people may not recognize is that men are victims too.

The U.S. Department of Justice estimates that 1.3 million women and 835,000 men are victims of physical violence by a partner every year Every 9 seconds, a woman in the U.S. is beaten or assaulted by a current or ex-significant other. 1 in 4 men are victims of some form of physical violence by an intimate partner.

Information found on nationaldaycalendar.com is spot on and may help many of us who don’t understand things about domestic violence that we do not understand.

People who are in an abusive relationship will stay with their partner for a number of reasons:

  • Their self-esteem is totally destroyed, and they are made to feel they will never be able to find another person to be with.
  • The cycle of abuse, meaning the ‘honeymoon phase’ that follows physical and mental abuse, makes them believe their partner really is sorry and does love them.
  • It’s dangerous to leave. Women are 70 times more likely to be killed in the weeks after leaving their abusive partner than at any other time in the relationship, according to the Domestic Violence Intervention program.
  • Statistics suggest that almost 5 percent of male homicide victims each year are killed by an intimate partner.
  • They feel personally responsible for their partner, or their own behavior. They are made to feel like everything that goes wrong is their fault.
  • They share a life. Marriages, children, homes, pets, and finances are a big reason victims of abuse feel they can’t leave.

They also list this helpful list to help those who may be being abused and are not sure or feel it is them not their partner’s fault.

Here are a few ways to know if you’re in an abusive relationship that you need to get out of.

  • Your partner has hit you, beat you, or strangled you in the past.
  • Your partner is possessive. They check up on you constantly wondering where you are; they get mad at you for hanging out with certain people if you don’t do what they say.
  • Your partner is jealous. (A small amount of jealousy is normal and healthy) however, if they accuse you of being unfaithful or isolate you from family or friends, that means the jealousy has gone too far.
  • Your partner puts you down. They attack your intelligence, looks, mental health, or capabilities. They blame you for all of their violent outbursts and tell you nobody else will want you if you leave.
  • Your partner threatens you or your family.
  • Your partner physically and sexually abuses you. If they EVER push, shove, or hit you, or make you have sex with them when you don’t want to, they are abusing you (even if it doesn’t happen all the time.)

Share in this awareness by wearing purple, purple decorations, or just a purple ribbon. Purple and pink go together well, the purple can be shared with the pink for breast cancer awareness. month, both such important causes.

The color for Domestic Violence Awareness Month is purple.
https://www.portsmouth-dailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/28/2020/10/web1_DV.jpgThe color for Domestic Violence Awareness Month is purple. Courtesy Photo

By Kimberly Jenkins

kjenkins@aimmediamidwest.com

Reach Kimberly Jenkins (740)353-3101 ext. 1928

© 2020 Portsmouth Daily Times, all rights

Reach Kimberly Jenkins (740)353-3101 ext. 1928

© 2020 Portsmouth Daily Times, all rights