Bells are ringing for our community; Part 2: Salvation Army bells ring at retailers


Part 2: Salvation Army bells ring at retailers

By Hope R. Comer | PDT - hcomer@aimmediamidwest.com



Teresa Copas rings the bell for Salvation Army at the Portsmouth Kroger location.

Teresa Copas rings the bell for Salvation Army at the Portsmouth Kroger location.


Since 1834 the Salvation Army’s signature red kettles have been collecting, and bells have been ringing to help those in need.

This year, volunteers will be ringing the bells till Dec. 24 and can be heard and seen while shopping at West IGA, Portsmouth Kroger, Big Lots, Rural King, New Boston Walmart, Wheelersburg Kroger, Food Fair (Deemers), and Minford IGA.

Those volunteers from The Salvation Army are ringing bells for donations in its kettles to help support the community not only at Christmas but throughout the year. The kettles are at most locations Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

“The monetary donations will help with Christmas assistance (toys and food), social service assistance, summer day camp for children, weeklong sleep away camps for children, weekday feeding programs, warming stations, Tuesday after-school programs, Emergency Disaster Response and women/men’s character-building programs,” said Captain Dan Simco of the Salvation Army.

Being charitable is rewarding, not only to those on the receiving end of others’ good deeds but also for those doing the giving.

Research conducted by the National Institutes of Health found participants who choose to donate a portion of money they were provided activated pleasure centers in the brain. Doing something positive can be uplifting and being charitable helps others in need.

Quite often, people who engage in charitable works find inspiration through their efforts. That’s because working with a nonprofit group can create opportunities to meet new people, socialize and be surrounded with like-minded individuals. It also may help adults serve as role models to youngsters. Children who see their parents or other adults being charitable may be more likely to be philanthropic when they grow up.

For more information on volunteering for The Salvation Army, stop by 1001 Ninth Street, Portsmouth or call 740-353-2400.

Every little bit counts when being charitable. Philanthropy doesn’t mean donating thousands of dollars or lots of hours volunteering. The following are some relatively easy ways to incorporate charity into one’s life.

· Collect change: Place a coin jar near where you put your keys or wallet when entering the house. Empty loose change into the jar and watch it fill up. Use the collected funds to donate to a charitable group.

· Become a leader: Volunteer your time as a scout troop leader, coach a sports team, or offer free tutoring for students. You’ll be making an immediate difference in the lives of young people.

· Throw a party: Host a party with a philanthropic theme. Guests can arrive and donate or bring a gift that will go to a charitable cause.

· Use your hobby: Participate in charity fundraisers that incorporate some of your favorite hobbies. For those who knit or craft, donate, or sell your creations for the good of those in need.

Being charitable is easier than one might think, and even the smallest efforts can produce significant results. Take time to help in our community this season.

Teresa Copas rings the bell for Salvation Army at the Portsmouth Kroger location.
https://www.portsmouth-dailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/28/2019/12/web1_BELL06.jpgTeresa Copas rings the bell for Salvation Army at the Portsmouth Kroger location.
Part 2: Salvation Army bells ring at retailers

By Hope R. Comer | PDT

hcomer@aimmediamidwest.com

Reach Hope R. Comer (740) 353-3101 ext. 1911

© 2019 Portsmouth Daily Times, all rights

Reach Hope R. Comer (740) 353-3101 ext. 1911

© 2019 Portsmouth Daily Times, all rights