Time changes Sunday


By Kimberly Jenkins - kjenkins@aimmediamidwest.com



Sunday, November 3, 2019 at 2:00 a.m. - Set your clocks back an hour.

Sunday, November 3, 2019 at 2:00 a.m. - Set your clocks back an hour.


According to an article by Leada Gore in AL.com, the annual fall ritual of “falling back” – moving your clock back one hour to accommodate the end of daylight saving time – is this weekend. Daylight saving time officially ends at 2 a.m. local time Sunday, November 3. Most people will move their clocks back one hour before going to bed on Saturday night. The change essentially moves more daylight hours into the morning and more darkness into the evening hours A tilt in the Earth’s axis means significant changes in day length during the year for much of the world. As daylight saving time ends at 2 a.m. this coming Sunday morning, most Americans will join snoozers across more than 60 other nations in savoring the gift of one extra hour of sleep.

Benjamin Franklin suggested the idea back in 1784, as a way to economize on sunlight and burn fewer candles during winter mornings and nights, but the practice did not become steadily official in the United States until Congress passed the Uniform Time Act in 1966, with the same intention of saving energy. Whether or not the practice actually shrinks energy bills seems to vary from state to state and remains up for debate today, which is a big part of the controversy.

The move from Daylight Savings Time will take place almost everywhere in the U.S., with the exception of Hawaii and most of Arizona, which do not observe the change.

In an article in Fast Company.com, dated March 8, 2019, while many people blame farmers for Daylight Saving Time, the idea actually came about due to the much more blame-worthy military-industrial complex. Daylight Saving Time was enacted in the U.S. in 1918 as a way of conserving energy to support the military and the war effort. It was repealed a year later, then re-established during World War II, and finally standardized in 1966.

According to Business Insider, 2017, many Americans believe the practice is not worth the hassle. Daylight-saving time, or DST, began in the US in 1918 as a way to conserve energy. Nearly 100 years later, though, the US is a divided nation on this topic. A 2012 survey of 1,000 American adults found that 45% thought daylight-saving was worth it, while more than 40% considered it worthless. More than 152,560 people have petitioned Congress to end daylight-saving time.

There are two main proposals to get rid of DST: by creating fewer time zones or moving to one universal time. Both it would seem make sense, but this controversy has been lingering for many years now and no permanent solution has been found, so just like most Americans, on Sunday, follow the protocol and set those clocks back an hour, whether you like it or not.

Sunday, November 3, 2019 at 2:00 a.m. – Set your clocks back an hour.
https://www.portsmouth-dailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/28/2019/10/web1_Fall-Back.jpgSunday, November 3, 2019 at 2:00 a.m. – Set your clocks back an hour.

By Kimberly Jenkins

kjenkins@aimmediamidwest.com

Reach Kimberly Jenkins (740) 353-3101 ext. 1928

© 2019 Portsmouth Daily Times, all rights

Reach Kimberly Jenkins (740) 353-3101 ext. 1928

© 2019 Portsmouth Daily Times, all rights