Masonry student wins state competition


By Kimberly Jenkins - kjenkins@aimmediamidwest.com



Eli Webb from the Scioto County Career and Technical Center (SCCTC) in front of an entrance he helped build.

Eli Webb from the Scioto County Career and Technical Center (SCCTC) in front of an entrance he helped build.


Kimberly Jenkins

Eli Webb competing at the State competition in Columbus.


Submitted Photos

Larry Moore, Masonry Instructor at the SCCTC with student Eil Webb, with his state-winning masonry piece.


Submitted Photos

Being the only one representing the state of Ohio in any competition is quite an honor, and one of the local students at the SCCTC will be doing just that this summer. It will not be in sports, but it is still just as important and a wonderful opportunity for any student to be the only one in Ohio to represent his school, community and the state.

Eli Webb is a junior studying masonry at the Scioto County Career and Technical Center(SCCTC) and his home school is Green Local. Webb’s Masonry Instructor is Larry Moore. Webb competed last week at the State Competition for Vocational and technical schools. At this competition, Webb won first place and will be representing the state of Ohio in the Nationals.

Webb was the lone student from the SCCTC, competing in the Masonry program. He said he has known he wanted to study masonry for quite a long time. His mother is Janet Webb and his father, Earl Webb, died about a year and a half ago and he was a bricklayer. Webb knew he wanted to follow in his father’s footsteps so Eli had laid brick before he came to Moore’s class, his older brother, also Earl Webb, studied masonry at the SCCTC a few years before. He stated that to compete at the state, you don’t really have to compete anywhere else because there is no regional competition. He did compete in the Masonry competition at the SCCTC with other juniors and he w0n first place, but those type of competitions are just like practices before the state competition.

Moore says that what he does as the instructor, is he takes the scores from their competition to decide who gets to compete at the State Competition. Webb scored the highest out of the juniors and seniors and that is how he got to go. At the state competition, he competed against both juniors and seniors.

Webb said that at the state competition, one student kept telling him that his project was better than his, but Webb said he knew better. Webb said the student knew Webb had won, but then on a crazy twist, the judges announced that Webb was second, and this guy was first. Webb said in just a small window of time after the announcement, several of the masonry instructors said that something had to be wrong, because they all knew Webb’s project was by far the best. Moore said he left right after the announcement because he knew that Webb most definitely should have won, so he was upset. He said on the way home, he started making phone calls to see what could be done to fix this. He said he got to South Bloomfield when Webb called him and said they called them all back in and said there had been a mistake in the calculations and Webb was the winner by 75 points.

“I knew I won, there was no way, no way, so then after the other instructors started complaining, they had to prove that the other guy got first, and I actually beat him by 85 points,” Webb said. “They had a score of 20 on one part of the scoring, instead of the 120 that I had gotten.”

Moore said that Webb is the only one from the state of Ohio that will be competing at the Nationals for Masonry. The national competition will be held in Louisville, Ky. on the week of June 24th. Webb laughingly said about going for the week that since the school’s paying, “I’m gonna eat like a pig.”

Moore says when they get there at the competition they will go on tours and on Thursday at the competition, they give him the blueprints and he goes to build, no practice time, no getting ready, “I think he and I will have maybe ten minutes to talk about the project, other than that, he goes to building.” Moore said Webb does really well with the reading of the blueprint and then going to work. Webb said he enjoys laying brick and competing. “He is a joy to have in class, he’s a hard worker and he’s one that if I give him a job, he goes and does it and I don’t have to watch over him,” Moore said. He said he tells his students they need three things to be successful: desire, drive, and determination.

Webb said when he graduates, that if he joins the union, he would like going away to work. Moore says that competing in the Nationals will open doors for Webb when he graduates, he will be able to pick and choose where he wants to go what he wants to do. There will be companies at the national show that will be giving him or Moore business cards, wanting him to work for them. Moore said Webb has already had offers to go to work. Moore also said the average rate of a masonry person is 50 or older and when those people start retiring there will be a large demand for bricklayers.

Eli Webb from the Scioto County Career and Technical Center (SCCTC) in front of an entrance he helped build.
https://www.portsmouth-dailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/28/2019/04/web1_Eli-VT.jpgEli Webb from the Scioto County Career and Technical Center (SCCTC) in front of an entrance he helped build. Kimberly Jenkins

Eli Webb competing at the State competition in Columbus.
https://www.portsmouth-dailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/28/2019/04/web1_Eli.jpgEli Webb competing at the State competition in Columbus. Submitted Photos

Larry Moore, Masonry Instructor at the SCCTC with student Eil Webb, with his state-winning masonry piece.
https://www.portsmouth-dailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/28/2019/04/web1_Larry-and-Eli.jpgLarry Moore, Masonry Instructor at the SCCTC with student Eil Webb, with his state-winning masonry piece. Submitted Photos

By Kimberly Jenkins

kjenkins@aimmediamidwest.com

Reach Kimberly Jenkins (740) 353-3101 ext. 1928

© 2019 Portsmouth Daily Times, all rights reserved

Reach Kimberly Jenkins (740) 353-3101 ext. 1928

© 2019 Portsmouth Daily Times, all rights reserved