Fifteen minutes could be fatal


By Ivy Potter - ipotter@aimmediamidwest.com



Leaving your pet in a parked car for any amount of time could lead to heatstroke and death.

Leaving your pet in a parked car for any amount of time could lead to heatstroke and death.


Courtesy photo

In just 15 minutes an animal can sustain serious brain damage or die from heatstroke.

You would never purposely leave your infant, or small child, in a car on a summer day, so why would you subject your pet to those circumstances? This week’s forecast shows temperatures as high as 85 degrees, and leaving your dog in a hot car for “just a minute” could result in heatstroke.

According to a bulletin posted by PETA (People for the ethical treatment of animals), on a 78 degree day a parked car can reach temperatures of 100 degrees in minutes, and on a day when the temperature is 90 degrees, the temperature inside can reach 109 degrees in less than ten minutes. Contrary to what people might think, according to the Humane Society of the United States rolling down the windows has been shown to have little effect on the temperature inside a parked car, and leaving your pet in the vehicle with it is running and air conditioner on is still not advised. Unlike humans, dogs do not have the ability to sweat and pant to eliminate heat from the body. When faced with intense heat, panting is not enough and the animal’s body temperature rises creating a dangerous situation that could be fatal.

Signs of heatstroke in animals can include heavy panting, glazed eyes, a rapid heartbeat, difficulty breathing, excessive thirst, lethargy, fever, dizziness, lack of coordination, profuse salivation, vomiting, a deep red or purple tongue, seizure, and unconsciousness. According to the Humane Society of the United States, Animals are at particular risk for heat stroke if they are very old, very young, overweight, not conditioned to prolonged exercise, or have heart or respiratory disease.

Some breeds of dog, such as boxers, pugs, shih-tzus, and other dogs and cats with short muzzles, will have a much harder time breathing in extreme heat. In just the few minutes it takes to run an errand, your pet could suffer a horrific death, and you could face serious charges for animal neglect.

To report an instance of an animal left in a hot car, call the local authorities. Portsmouth City Health Department sais when calling to report an animal being left in a hot car, it is important to know the make, model, and license number of the vehicle, as well as information on the location of the vehicle. In most cases, an officer or animal control officer will appear on scene and assess the situation. In the event the animal is found to be in immediate distress, the animal control officer will remove the animal and emergency steps will be taken to lower the animal’s body temperature

Leaving your pet in a parked car for any amount of time could lead to heatstroke and death.
https://www.portsmouth-dailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/28/2018/07/web1_DOGGGIE2_ne2018730124922832.jpgLeaving your pet in a parked car for any amount of time could lead to heatstroke and death. Courtesy photo

By Ivy Potter

ipotter@aimmediamidwest.com

Reach: Ivy Potter (740) 353-3101 Extension 1932

Reach: Ivy Potter (740) 353-3101 Extension 1932