James K. Uphoff, Ed.D. promotes ‘Justice for All’; book examines problems in justice system, possible solutions for reform


Book examines problems in justice system, possible solutions for reform

Staff report



James K. Uphoff, Ed.D. supports the notion that social equality is a fundamental right to the constitution and deserves examination. With this, he gives a comprehensive view of the total judicial system and the problems one may find throughout its many levels in “Justice for All” (published by AuthorHouse). According to Uphoff, the book concludes the Pledge of Allegiance but it does not exist in the lives of millions of citizens. “We must be willing to look at the problems and at possible solutions if we are ever going to be able to reform our Justice system.”

The author further explains that the book deals with many of life’s most crucial elements from constitutional right to protection of one’s religion and the right to regular and quality medical care. It also deals with right to a jury trial by peers, education to build skills and knowledge of use to society, and growth toward rehabilitation in society when released.

Uphoff also highlights the book’s potential appeal, “Readers who care about their nation and its people will find this book challenging and stimulating as they struggle to more fully understand the ‘system’ and the ways that they might be able to reform it for the better.”

An excerpt from the book:

“There is much to do and it will take the concerted effort of all parts of our society working together in order to make this reform happen.”

“Justice for All”

By James K. Uphoff, Ed.D.

Available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble

Book examines problems in justice system, possible solutions for reform

Staff report

About the Author

James K. Uphoff, Ed.D. was born on 1937, and raised and educated in Nebraska with a brother eight and a half years older. He taught in middle School for six years, and married a teacher, Harriet L. Uphoff, in 1962. He moved to Lincoln, Nebraska to finish his doctorate in education, then moved to Dayton in 1967 to work at Wright State University as a professor of education.

He directed laboratory experiences in education from 1981-1991 and became chairman of teacher education in 1994. In 1997 he was honored as University Outstanding faculty member in scholarship, service, and teaching. He was appointed as associate director of WSU Center for Teaching and Learning in charge of WSU faculty development in 1999-2012.

About the Author

James K. Uphoff, Ed.D. was born on 1937, and raised and educated in Nebraska with a brother eight and a half years older. He taught in middle School for six years, and married a teacher, Harriet L. Uphoff, in 1962. He moved to Lincoln, Nebraska to finish his doctorate in education, then moved to Dayton in 1967 to work at Wright State University as a professor of education.

He directed laboratory experiences in education from 1981-1991 and became chairman of teacher education in 1994. In 1997 he was honored as University Outstanding faculty member in scholarship, service, and teaching. He was appointed as associate director of WSU Center for Teaching and Learning in charge of WSU faculty development in 1999-2012.