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Last updated: February 04. 2014 12:13PM - 14441 Views
By - flewis@civitasmedia.com - 740-353-3101



Ice crystals glisten in the sunlight on a bridge over Falls Lake in Wake Forest, N.C., on Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. Temperatures reached the single digits. A storm that dropped just inches of snow Tuesday wreaked havoc across much of the South, closing highways, grounding flights and contributing to at least a dozen deaths from traffic accidents and a mobile home fire. (AP Photo)
Ice crystals glisten in the sunlight on a bridge over Falls Lake in Wake Forest, N.C., on Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. Temperatures reached the single digits. A storm that dropped just inches of snow Tuesday wreaked havoc across much of the South, closing highways, grounding flights and contributing to at least a dozen deaths from traffic accidents and a mobile home fire. (AP Photo)
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By Frank Lewis


flewis@civitasmedia.com


Kim Carver, director of the Scioto County Emergency Management Agency, warned people Tuesday morning that they needed to get home and “hunker down” because of an ice storm that is one the way.


“This has been one of those storms that was hard to pin down the exact type of precipitation. It was all driven by temperature,” Carver said. “The final resolution of all the models now puts us in an ice zone for this storm, where initially they thought it would be heavy rain as the predominant precipitation type.”


Carver said our area has officially been upgraded from a winter storm warning overnight (Tuesday night into Wednesday morning) to an ice warning late this morning.


“It looks like the ice accumulation will be fairly significant, as much as half an inch,” Carver said. “And then, additionally, some snow and sleet accumulations of 1-4 inches.”


Carver said, if that does occur, she would anticipate electric power outages.


“Also we have a bit of a salt shortage, which is a statewide-issue,” Carver said. “So if we have an ice storm and we don’t have plentiful salt supplies, there could be tragic complications as well as people might have power issues.”


Carver issued advice to area residents.


“We just want to get the word out to people to be safe, be smart, gets some supplies and get home, and stay in if they can this evening, until this ice accumulation event is over sometime in the overnight and early morning hours on Wednesday,” Carver said. “The ice storm warning runs from 4 p.m. today (Tuesday) through 10 (a.m.) o’clock on Wednesday.”


An ice storm warning is in effect from 4 p.m. this afternoon until 10 a.m. Wednesday. Hazard types include heavy ice accumulations with some snow and sleet accumulations from half an inch to 4 inches, and with ice accumulations of one quarter inch to one half inch.


Travel will be extremely dangerous, primarily due to ice accumulations. The ice will accumulate appreciably in a short period of time. Untreated roads and sidewalks will become a sheet of ice. Heavy ice accumulations will likely down some tree limbs and power lines.


An ice storm warning means severe winter weather conditions are expected or occurring. Significant amounts of ice accumulations will make travel dangerous or impossible. Travel is strongly discouraged. Commerce will likely be severely impacted. The NWS says, if you must travel, keep an extra flashlight, food and water in your vehicle in case of an emergency. Ice accumulations and winds will likely lead to snapped power lines and falling tree branches that add to the danger.


The NWS urges residents to stay tuned to NOAA weather radio or their favorite source of information for the latest updates. Additional details can also be found at www.weather.gov/iln— as well as on their Facebook and Twitter pages.


Frank Lewis can be reached at 740-353-3101, Ext. 252, or on Twitter @FrankLewispdt.


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