Pruning Young Trees Saves Future Cost


Pruning Young Trees Saves Future Cost

By Steve Boehme



Young trees are like children; proper training from a young age prevents minor flaws from becoming major problems later. Structural problems on trees are difficult and expensive to fix once the tree grows large, but just a few cuts on a young tree can set things right. Correct pruning cuts reduce future work and expense.

Winter is the best time to prune trees. In winter it’s easy to spot where the problems are, and winter pruning is not harmful to trees because they are dormant. The worst tree defects can be fixed, without climbing, when your trees are still young. There are some simple and easy steps you can take to train young trees.

First, here’s how to make a proper cut without hurting the tree: To cut tree limbs properly make three cuts: 1. Make a cut on the underside of the limb a few inches above the spot where it meets the trunk. This will prevent tearing or peeling of the bark when you cut the limb off. 2. Cut downward from above, a few inches further out on the limb, until it falls. This will leave a short stub. 3. Cut the stub off. Make the cut straight across the remaining limb, not parallel to the trunk. The exposed end should be round, not oval. Take special care not to damage the “branching collar”; the wrinkled flare of bark around the base of the limb. This will then grow and quickly cover the open cut. Never leave a stub longer than a half-inch, because the bark can’t heal over your cut and this invites tree problems.

The reason for cutting in three steps is that you can’t cut at the proper angle from above, because the tree trunk interferes with your saw. The final cut has to be made from below. The heavy branch will cause your saw to bind in the cut and get stuck. By cutting most of the limb off first, you take the weight off so you can make the final cut easily and precisely.

The most important defect to fix early is too many trunks. This defect is called “co-dominant leaders”. You should cut off all but the strongest, straightest one, right at the base of the tree.

Another common defect to look for is called a “bark-included crotch”. This defect occurs when, instead of a healthy limb attached to the trunk, a tree forms a close crotch with a layer of bark hidden inside. The limb and trunk are not well attached, since the bark forms a seam down inside the tree. The best and easiest time to fix bark-included crotches is when they first occur on young trees, before the limb is thicker than your thumb. You can simply cut the offending limb off at the crotch and it will heal over in a single season.

As young trees grow you should gradually “limb up” the lower branches before they grow too thick, so there is clearance to mow or walk underneath. Proper pruning cuts will heal quickly and disappear. Just make sure not to injure the “branching collar” when you cut.

Many people are afraid to prune or cut trees for fear of damaging or killing them. This fear prevents them from making simple corrections when they’re easy to make. Remember “a stitch in time saves nine”? Get over your fear and you’ll actually have healthier, stronger trees. You’ll be amazed how proper pruning cuts heal over without a trace. Once you see this work you’ll be proud of yourself.

Choosing the best privacy screen plants

Do you live in a fish bowl? Would you like to put a curtain between your private living spaces and the rest of the neighborhood? Or perhaps there’s something unsightly next door that you’d prefer not to see?

You don’t need to cover your windows with blinds and curtains, or build a high board fence around your back yard. There are better, prettier ways to block sight lines into, or out of, your private spaces. We like to do it with plants. Choosing the right plants for privacy screen, there are lots of choices. You probably don’t need a hedge of pointy upright evergreens or a straight row of pine trees, but if you do let’s choose the right ones.

First, let’s figure out exactly which sight lines you’re trying to mask. How wide and tall a planting do you really need? Often, just one well-chosen tree or large shrub would take care of the problem, without blocking your view of the horizon or cutting off the summer breeze. Let’s actually measure the section of your property line that would need to be blocked, to get the result you want. Does the privacy planting need to start from the ground up? Is the sight line you’re trying to block actually high above ground level? Visualize the exact shape and size of the plant or plants you need. Chances are there’s a plant the right size and shape that would thrive in that spot.

If your neighbors, or street traffic, annoy you so much that you want an impenetrable evergreen hedge (perhaps with thorns?) so be it. For faster results you can “stagger” the plants. If cost is no object, you can install “instant results” sized plants. If you’re on a tight budget you can plant small container-grown examples of the same species. Space the plants the same either way. Spacing should be 75% of the plants’ mature footprint.

How much space do you have for a privacy planting? Norway spruce is one of our favorite privacy screen plants (and also a terrific windbreak), but a mature Norway spruce is 20 feet across at the base, and grows over 50 feet tall. This is a good choice for homeowners with larger yards, or people with small backyards who don’t need the space.

The opposite extreme is tall, narrow evergreens like arborvitae, with a footprint of 3 to 5 feet. The downside is that it takes so many plants to make an effective screen. Deer are also a problem; for deer most arborvitae are like having a salad bar open up in your neighborhood.

We like the Viburnum family of shrubs for privacy. They are dense, fast-growing and trouble-free, attractive to birds, and have a footprint of 6 to 12 feet wide depending on variety. “Mariesii” Viburnums have showy blooms and colorful fall foliage. “Allegheny” Viburnums are semi-evergreen and do well in the shade of larger trees.

When designing privacy plantings we always make a plan drawing. This allows us to arrange privacy plants in ways that do the most good with the least cost, and the least obstruction of views you actually enjoy. Simply blocking unpleasant sightlines and leaving the rest open may be all the privacy planting you really need.

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Pruning Young Trees Saves Future Cost

By Steve Boehme

Reach Steve Boehme at (937)587-7021 or steve@goodseedfarm.com

Steve Boehme is a landscape designer/installer specializing in landscape “makeovers”.

Reach Steve Boehme at (937)587-7021 or steve@goodseedfarm.com

Steve Boehme is a landscape designer/installer specializing in landscape “makeovers”.

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